Album Reviews, Music - posted on July 12, 2022 by

Album Review: The Local Honeys Bring Kentucky To The World With Their Self-Titled Release On La Honda Records

Have you ever heard a song or artist that you immediately knew where they’re from and what to expect? It’s not all that common, but when it happens, I often find there’s an unusually deep connection with that song or artist moving forward. It’s like they allow you to know who they are immediately. There’s no digging around, trying to figure them out. What you see, or in this case, what you hear, is exactly what you get. It’s those artists that I find incredibly refreshing, and endearing.

The Local Honeys give you that immediate introduction. With their new self-titled release on La Honda Records, these two ladies have embodied the history, the people, the music, the dialect, the kindness, the love, and the beauty of what it means to be a Kentuckian. When you push play, you feel at home, immediately.

**Photo taken at my first Local Honeys show back in 2017**

That feeling was no accident. As the first two women to graduate from Morehead University with a Bachelor’s of Arts in Traditional Music Degree, Linda Jean Stokley and Montana Hobbs set a course to honor the traditional music that has been created here in Kentucky. As you’ll soon hear, that mission is accomplished, but with a twist. You can call this album a straight-up bluegrass album, but it’s much, much more. These ladies have struck a balance of traditional bluegrass that has an ever-expanding sound. You’ll hear banjo, fiddle, acoustic guitars, electric guitars, drums, an organ, and even a trumpet. Yes, you read that correctly, a trumpet.

Linda Jean and Montana have been on this trajectory for several years, and since their beginnings as a duo, one very important man has been a constant supporter, Professor Jesse Wells at Morehead University. There’s another reason that name may sound familiar, he’s also a member of The Foodstamps. The backing band of Mr. Tyler Childers. Jesse’s familiarity, knowledge, and unbelievable skill made him the perfect co-producer for this project. As a mentor, he’s almost an honorary Honey. His familiarity with The Honeys music and goals shine through like a mid-day’s Summer sun.

(more…)

view the whole post 0

Music, News - posted on June 9, 2022 by

The Local Honeys Release New Single “Better Than I Deserve”

Lexington, KY – June 3, 2022 – Linda Jean Stokley and Montana Hobbs, better known as the beloved Kentuckian duo, The Local Honeys, have a gifted way with words—particularly the playful colloquialisms and regional idiosyncrasies from their home in the Bluegrass State—that simultaneously connects the past and present, old and new. They bind stories with warm vernacular that makes those in-the-know feel warm and welcome and those not, well, flat out curious to hear more. On Wednesday, DittyTV premiered The Local Honeys’ newest “Better Than I Deserve” from their upcoming self-titled album (out July 15th via La Honda Records), of which the title itself was an everyday motto of Hobbs’s Papaw; a positive answer for the oft-asked question, “How are you doing?” A moody two-step, “Better Than I Deserve” tells the story of Montana’s grandfather who was an orphan, a U.S. naval pilot, and a war survivor. “‘Better than I deserve’ was his motto in life and carried him through many hardships,” says Hobbs, who built the whole song around his iconic informal greeting.

 

Fans can pre-order or pre-save The Local Honeys ahead of its July 15th release at this link.

Their first release on La Honda Records (Colter Wall, Riddy Arman, Vincent Neil Emerson), The Local Honeys features ten winsome vignettes of rural Kentucky, conjuring 90’s alternatives sounds with hillbilly Radiohead lilts, soaring above layers of deep grooves and rich tones masterfully curated by longtime mentor Jesse Wells, a GRAMMY-nominated producer, musician (currently a member of Tyler Childers’ band The Food Stamps), and Assistant Director at the Kentucky Center for Traditional Music at Morehead State.

(more…)

view the whole post 0

Music, News - posted on February 8, 2021 by

The Local Honeys Release A Pair Of Ever-Poignant Singles About The Tribulations Of Coal Mining In Their Native Kentucky

You might have seen The Local Honeys open for Colter Wall or  Tyler Childers. If not and you’re behind, start with the double-side single they released today on La Honda Records. “Way down in the hole where he earns his pay, it’s dark and unforgiving. Digging this coal and digging his grave, he’s dying to make a living.” Talk about direct, “Dying To Make A Living,” along with its double-single counterpart “Octavia Triangle,” pulls no punches in painting a grim, realistic picture of life lived working underground. Sonically, this double-single from The Local Honeys represents two sides of old-time music— one led by phase-shifted electric guitar and the other by clawhammer banjo, both a beautiful complement of the other. Both tracks were released today via La Honda Records (home of Colter Wall, Vincent Neil Emerson) and can be purchased or streamed right here. Hear more about the origin of “Dying To Make A Living” and “Octavia Triangle” from The Local Honeys in this behind the scenes video

In Their Own Words: “‘Dying to Make A Living’ is a song we first heard a few years ago from Rich & the Po’ Folks at the Seedtime on the Cumberland festival in Letcher Co., Kentucky. They were performing a traditional adaptation of the song, written in 2006, by WV Hill and AJ Mullins of the band Foddershock in Southwest Virginia. The song is a prime example of the continued collaborative nature within this region. Traditional music is an evolving art form, living and breathing in generations as they come and go. This song is an honest and brutal commentary of the working men and women dying to make a living at the expense of their bodies to power the world outside of Appalachia.” 

(more…)

view the whole post 0